Home > Combating Poverty and Inequality: Structural Change, Social Policy and Politics

Combating Poverty and Inequality: Structural Change, Social Policy and Politics

Combating Poverty and Inequality: Structural Change, Social Policy and Politics

The new UNRISD report seeks to explain why people are poor and why inequalities exist, as well as what can be done to rectify these injustices. CROP is assisting UNRISD and NORAD with the launch of the report in Norway.

25 November 2010 / Oslo, Norway

The report argues that many current approaches to reducing poverty and inequality fail to consider key institutional, policy and political dimensions that may be both causes of poverty and inequality, and obstacles to their reduction.Moreover, when a substantial proportion of a country’s population is poor, it makes little sense to detach poverty from the dynamics of development. For countries that have been successful in increasing the well-being of the majority of their populations over relatively short periods of time, the report shows, progress has occurred principally through state-directed strategies that combine economic development objectives with active social policies and forms of politics that elevate the interests of the poor in public policy.

The report is structured around three main issues, which, it argues, are the critical elements of a sustainable and inclusive development strategy:
-patterns of growth and structural change (whether in the agricultural, industrial or service sectors) that generate and sustain jobs that are adequately remunerated and accessible to all, regardless of income or class status, gender, ethnicity or location;
-comprehensive social policies that are grounded in universal rights and that are supportive of structural change, social cohesion and democratic politics; and
-protection of civic rights, activism and political arrangements that ensure states are responsive to the needs of citizens and the poor have influence in how policies are made.

The report seeks to explain why people are poor and why inequalities exist, as well as what can be done to rectify these injustices. It explores the causes, dynamics and persistence of poverty; examines what works and what has gone wrong in international policy thinking and practice; and lays out a range of policies and institutional measures that countries can adopt to alleviate poverty.

Place and time: NORAD, Oslo, 13:00-14:30, November 25.

The report can be read in full at the UNRISD website.

21.10.2014
Share:         
UiB ISSC

CROP Events

Joint winners: CROP International Studies in Poverty Prize 2014

3 December 2014

The CROP Secretariat is pleased to announce that the CROP International Studies in Poverty Prize 2014, organised in co-operation with Zed Books has named two joint winners.

Call for papers: Poverty, Water and Development in the South

3-5 June 2015 / Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil

International workshop organised by CROP, the Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana (UNILA, Brazil), the Nile Basin Research Programme (NBRP), and UiB.

CROP video interview with Bergen Summer Research School 2015

Poverty as the “greatest global challenge facing the world today” and how this relates to the Bergen Summer Research School 2015.

News from CROPNET

New book by David Hulme

January 2015

David Hulme is a member of CROP's Scientific Committee. His new book, "Global Poverty - Global governance and poor people in the Post-2015 Era", 2nd Edition, will be published by Routledge in early 2015.

Assistant Professorship in International Affairs at New School

A full time faculty position in the Studley Graduate Program in International Affairs (SGPIA) at the New School, New York.

Call for Papers: Symposium on Global Governance and the Politics of Aid

30 April - 1 May 2015 / Bradford, UK

The objective of this symposium is to foster a critical, theoretically informed and policy relevant analysis of the way in which aid is organised, managed and delivered at global and local levels.